Jackson Homestead


2014.3.6.EN at JH card final bl p 2r

Radio interview on 1550 AM, WNTN, 4/4/2014

2014.3.31.Jackson Homestead press release

Thank you to our sponsors:

Walsh Construction Co Inc.

Joanne and Barry Reynolds

Craft Beer Cellar

Poetry Walk, June 1: curated by Susan Edwards Richmond

Poems online chapbook

Zachary Bos

Polly Brown

Cheryl Perrault

Linda Fialkoff

Lynn Horsky

Neil Horsky

Terry House

Lila Linda Terry

Joanne DeSimone Reynolds

Susan Edwards Richmond

bg Thurston

The full program is below- it can be printed here: Program Jackson Homestead

The artists’ information can be printed here: artist bios

Poetry Chapbook can be printed here: Jackson Homestead chapbook

 

Acquisitions_of_Light Milan KlicAcquisitions_of_Light#2 Milan Klic

Milan Klic

Acquisitions of Light, aluminum alloy, resin, steel, 9’ x 12’ x 4’

Light is becoming a precious property when human exploitation of earth escalates ‘climate change’, part of which is not only warming but ‘dimming’. This sculpture is a metaphor of anxiety from feeling the sky disappearing and earth enveloped in carpet of soot. We might begin collecting and ‘acquiring’ the light now for the future, even for trading on some market or other.

It is my attempt to appeal to collective conscience.

Milan Klic

Mine is a story of an immigrant, cultural fusion, ongoing, never complete.  I was born and educated in former Czechoslovakia, today’s Czech Republic.  At that time the country was a part of the communist block and all aspects of culture, visual arts in particular, were subject to political dogma and tough censorship.  My natural inclination towards sculpture seemed unrealistic in such environment, desires had to be put aside, postponed, silenced and reduced to dreams. I chose Natural Sciences (math, computer science) as a practical survivor’s way.  I graduated in 1974 from Palacky University, Olomouc  with MS and began my career as computer programmer.

As happens with totalitarian regimes, oppression spawns underground subculture where individuals live and create in seclusion, hiding from the society rather than seeking meaningful communication with others, except those who are in similar predicament – “internal emigrants”.  But, dreams are weaving their fabric in their realm, spontaneously, beyond rational and practical considerations. As a way of spiritual survival, I was seeking expression in visual arts, first drawing and terra-cotta sculptures, than wood-carved, figurative ones.  Most of the early figures are now in various private collections in Europe, others here

in US, reminders of a period of still evolving style.  Several exhibitions in the old country were recognized and appreciated mostly by people tied to the subculture by similar inner gravity. The conditions in former communist regime eventually led to emigration in 1985.

Exposure to highly technological, concept-driven civilization manifested itself in transformed perception, changed themes, materials used, and aesthetic values.  After the “Velvet revolution” in Czechoslovakia, when we all sighed with some relief, my sculptural expression was of rather intimate, lyrical nature. I gained a lot when I studied sculpture at Brandeis University, Waltham, MA in 1989-1992. Relatively peaceful 1990’s produced array of spatial metaphors, still readable in language of classical abstract modernism, bearing the seal of European heritage. But things are not going “velvet” in contemporary world; recent years profoundly changed our ways of thinking about the world, anxieties yet unknown are now common articles of everyday experience. I feel it as my inner choice to respond to this traumatized social and cultural milieu.

Awards

2001 -  Pollock-Krasner grant   Jan.-Dec. 2001

2003 – Cambridge Art Association, MA – award for best sculpture at annual show

2004 -  Cambridge Art Association, MA -  director’s choice award for sculpture

2004 -  Cambridge Art Association, MA – “Blue” , juried exhibition, “Best of Show” award

3 Bradford Terrace #3, Brookline MA, 02446 Phone 617-731-6240 E-mail: mklic@email.com

solar shards John Powell

shards of light med shards of light compressed

John Powell

Solar Shards

The piece is made up of multiple solar powered Plexiglas shards that will be hung in the mulberry tree at the corner of the lot — reflective in the daytime, light emitting at night — reference is from a tale from Martin Buber about the Bal shem tov.

 

Childrens Chairs Project Gail Bos

Gail Jerauld Bos

Children’s Chairs Project, Plywood,pine,paint

85 small children’s chairs, each chair: 3x1x1ft, surface area needed: 20x20ft, 2013

These chairs represent the children in our community, The 8 red chairs represent the 8 children killed each day, day after day in the USA by guns.  The 48 white chairs represent the children seriously wounded by guns each day, day after day in the USA.  The other colors show all the children affected by this violence At present they are being sheltered by this great tree, but when they look out towards their future…they see an extremely dangerous place…They need our attention and protection.

Gail Jerauld Bos

Gail Bos is an artist who has worked on many installations over the years. Usually the installations with strong political focus are set up on street corners and at random sites throughout the city.  Other installations are developed for shows held at the historic Footlight Club in Jamaica Plain, the Massachusetts Statehouse Doric Hall and the Cambridge Art Association.  Gail Bos, in conjunction with The Museum of the National Center for Afro-American Artists, does early education art programs in Boston Public Schools.  Her studio is located at: 52 Green St Jamaica Plain gailbos@comcast.net Website: wwwgailbos.com

 

hand Peter Kronberg (2)

Peter Kronberg

Reaching Hand, 2013, Cast Concrete, 3 roundels each: 16” x 15” x 2 ½

Challenge:  try to capture movement and human expression using hands, not faces.  Birds move beautifully.  Mushrooms because I was learning about them from Alex.  Plants are evocative, and difficult to sculpt.

I enjoy the opportunity to try to articulate myself in a material way.  I use materials that have always been used to make sculpture: clay, wood, plaster and metals but I also apply modern polymer mold making techniques.

Peter Kronberg

I am a business attorney who also makes sculpture.  I live and work in Newton.  I studied sculpture in school so I am not entirely self-taught. I have shown and sold my art over the years and I could provide you with a list of where and who but it isn’t terribly impressive and will bore you.

 Drone

Milan Klic

Drone, Aluminum alloy, Resin, steel, 9’ x 12’ x 4’

Drone is a metaphor of anxiety in a world saturated with surveillance and lethal technology, ultimately self-defeating.

 

 IMG_3100

Tempest Tossed

Peter Lipsitt & Susan Israel

Tempest Tossed, 2013, Steel, rubber, rope, wood mast. Reclaimed materials.8′ l x 10′ h x 2′ w

“Tempest Tossed” recalls the trade voyages that first bound and transported slaves on these ships. Some slaves broke free and escaped through places like the Jackson Homestead as a stop on the Underground Railroad.  But Tempest Tossed also evokes resilience and hope, lost and regained treasure, new beginnings, regeneration and reclamation.

Peter Lipsitt

Peter Lipsitt has shown outdoor sculpture at Harbor Arts East Boston (current);  Boston City Hall (current); Old Frog Pd., Harvard, MA (w/ Susan Israel); Chesterwood in Stockbridge, MA;  Lars Andersen Park, Brookline, curated by Nick Capasso; Triangle Arts Association, founded by Anthony Caro in Pine Plains, NY;  Lewis Wharf, Boston; Tiverton, RI; Wheaton College, Norton, MA; Wheelock College, Boston, MA; Sculpture Key West, Key West, FL; Rose Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA;  Art Complex Museum, Duxbury, MA. His work is in the collections of the Rose Art Museum, Fogg Art Musuem at Harvard University, Fort Lauderdale Museum, DeCordova Museum, Hamilton College, Vassar College, and in many private collections. Recently he completed a commission for a large outdoor steel work in New York state.

He has permanent large-scale public sculpture at Bajko Skating Rink in Hyde Park, MA,  University Place, Cambridge, and has outdoor work on extended loan in the outdoor atrium at Boston City Hall.

Peter Lipsitt, raised in an ocean-front Massachusetts village, is a graduate of Brandeis University (BA) and Yale University School of Art (BFA, MFA-1965). He also attended the Skowhegan School program.  In the 1960s he taught in the US Peace Corps in Ethiopia. At various times he has been a professor at Brandeis, Wheaton College, Emmanuel College, and Wentworth Institute in sculpture,drawing and/or design.

As a founding member of Boston Sculptors Gallery, he has presented many solo exhibitions in its successive gallery locations.  Fuller Art Museum, Wheaton College, Brown University, and Mather House, Harvard University have each given him solo exhibitions.

Lipsitt works in a variety of cast and assembled materials, most recently cement, steel, and wood in combination, having also created bronze and aluminum works in unique casts.  He is the recipient of a generous grant in 2007 from Artist Resource Trust (A.R.T.), a fund of Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation, faculty grants from Wheaton College, and other grants from the Brookline Arts Council.  His longtime studio is in the Piano Factory, South End, Boston, MA.

Susan Israel

In 2008 I decided that I wanted to do something to improve the environment that would have an impact beyond what I could do practicing architecture, as I had been for my entire career. What would motivate other people to do more as well? Something fun and visible. What was preventing people from doing more? Fear, and lack of belief that their actions matter. So I created the Energy Necklace Project to connect a community that fosters awareness and action about improving the health of our environment using art. Although my connection to art  has been start and stop over my life, I always return to it.  Energy Necklace Exhibitions and Rising Tides are my two major projects currently.  I also showed my own work in six exhibitions around Massachusetts in 2013, including several collaborations with Peter Lipsitt. An Energy Necklace Exhibition series will be at the Emerald Necklace in Boston starting Fall 2014.

The Energy Necklace Project uses art and workshops to teach sustainability, innovation and collaboration in businesses, communities and schools. We connect diverse communities in a dialogue about sustainability through the vehicle of public art and workshops and teach the skills of collaboration, leadership and creative thinking which are needed to innovate solutions. Through the Energy Necklace Project people become empowered to find solutions to overwhelming problems, and become connected to a larger community of solution seekers.

Procession

Procession small Linda Hoffman

Linda Hoffman and Gabrielle White

Procession, Metal, wood and rope

Procession explores the loss of connection to our agricultural past, to hard labor and handwork. ”Procession” renews our commitment to connect with the land. The charred figures rise out of the soil to lead the procession with wisdom. The old wagon wheels drive this movement into a new future as we cultivate the earth, the source of our sustenance.

Linda Hoffman

Linda Hoffman has been part of the New England artist community since the early 1980’s. Her work is in the collections of Harvard University, the Boston Public Library, the Pierpont Morgan Library, NY, Hechinger Tool Museum, DC, the Acton Arboretum, as well as many private collections. This spring she will install, Tree Harp, a large bronze sculpture commission for the Town of Littleton, New Hampshire. In the summer of 2001 she moved to Harvard, Massachusetts, and began work to bring back an abandoned orchard. In 2006, Old Frog Pond Farm became the first certified organic pick your orchard in the state.  Hoffman and her partner, Blase Provitola, host community, art, and agriculture events at the farm throughout the year, including the annual outdoor sculpture exhibit, Around the Pond and through the Woods during apple picking season.

Gabrielle White

Gabrielle White is a self-taught artist who has been sculpting and constructing art from repurposed material since childhood. She was inspired by her grandfather whose basement workshop held a magical array of bent and rusted objects waiting for a new life.  Time spent in the woods, rivers and mountains gave her a child’s eye and heart of an explorer.  Travels to Nepal opened her eyes to the spiritual realm and the connectedness of all things.

She is always experimenting with new ways to express a story through the creative recycling of items found in scrap metal piles, thrift shops, demolition sites and old barns. Her sculpture uses bicycle wheels, cast iron gears, glass, old tools, wood and stone to communicate our connection to the natural world.  Through her pieces she seeks to create the balance point between/within the physical and spiritual realms.

 

UmbilicalUmbilical closeup

Margot Stage

Umbilical, Clothing, beach rope

Umbilical is a celebration of life and of the primal connection we have to each other and to the earth itself.  It was created by braiding together strips of my recently deceased mother’s clothing, my clothing and found beach ropes.

Margot Stage

Margot Stage was introduced to fabric art in 2001. Previously, she worked as a National Public Radio producer and host, primarily at WGBH, and as a freelance writer. Stage’s work in the visual arts was immediately accepted into juried exhibitions and has been shown extensively. Recently, she has expanded into three-dimensional work and installations.

Her work has been selected for exhibition at The Carnegie Center for Art & History, Indiana; The International Quilt Festival, Texas; Anderson Chase Gallery and Main Street Gallery, New York. She has been accepted in the Northeast Prize Show, RED and BLUE at the Cambridge Art Association, and has shown her work at the Arsenal Center for the Arts, Fruitlands Museum, Fitchburg Art Museum, Arnold Arboretum, Whistler House Museum of Art, Brickbottom Gallery, Lesley University, Bunker Hill Community College, Indian Hill Music Center, Moose Hill Audubon Gallery, Concord Art Association, The Center for Art in Natick, Fiber Arts Center, Gallery 119, and Brush Art Gallery. Her audio art piece “Dune Shack Sound Track” was exhibited at The Schoolhouse Center for the Arts in Provincetown. Her monoprints were shown at the DeCordova Museum School Gallery.

Stage’s work has appeared in Fiber Arts Magazine, The Boston Globe, The Lowell Sun, Wild Apples, The Middlesex Beat, The Ithaca Journal, The Boston Phoenix, and The Westford Eagle. Her work is held in the collections of Enterprise Bank, The Jeanne D’Arc Credit Union and by many private individuals. She works out of the Western Avenue Studios in Lowell.

 

treedreams 2tree dreams 3

tree dreams 1

Gail Jerauld Bos

Tree Dreams, Plywood, paint packing straps for tree attachment, 2012

6 “trees tied to trunks of trees: each tree 10fth x 1ftw x 2in thickness of wood

Tree Dreams offers a visual interpretation of the joy that comes from being with trees. Fresh air, firewood, shade; what trees so generously give us does not entirely define this job.  There is something wildly difficult to express…is it that these giants’ life on earth extends long after ours?

This installation, made with cut and painted pieces of wood, is an imagined assortment of thoughts and dreams of trees.

 

Jeanne Williamson

Fence/Curtain 1.1, Mixed media on stiffened fabric,  4′ high x 24′ long

Fence/Curtain 1.1 is a repurposed decorative barrier. It was originally created in 2011 as a 35′ long installation that gave the illusion of the curtain, valance, different layers of fabric, and the drape of the curtain on the construction site of the future performance hall for the ConstellationCenter which will be located in Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA.

It is made of monoprinted textures of different patterns of construction fencing, and handstamped and hand painted geometric shapes, on cotton fabric that is stiffened and water resistant.

Jeanne Williamson

Jeanne Williamson’s work can be seen in galleries and museums, and in many books and magazines. A print of her work is also available at Crate & Barrel stores. She has a BFA from Philadelphia College of Art (now the University of the Arts), where she majored in Fibers/Crafts. In addition to being trained as an artist, Jeanne has an MSAEd in Art Education from Massachusetts College of Art. Jeanne is represented by the Gravers Lane Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, and the deCordova Museum of Art Corporate Art Loan Program in Lincoln, MA. Jeanne lives in Natick, MA with her husband.  website: http://www.jeannewilliamson.com

Fence Holes Bandage 2.0 Jeanne Williamson

 Jeanne Williamson

Fence Holes Bandage 2.0, mixed media on stiffened fabric, 22″ high x 54″+/- around the tree

Made of hand painted, scalloped rows and “holes” of monoprinted textures of construction fencing, on cotton fabric that is stiffened and water resistant.

 

Forest Falls 1 Forest Falls 2

Margot Stage and Linda Hoffman

Forest Falls, Twine, rope, string, fabric, 20’x10’x.5’

Forest Falls references the power, fluidity and endurance of water. Created by knotting various fibrous materials, this is the third in a series of collaborations between Margot Stage and Linda Hoffman.

 

rescue

Mary Dewart

Rescue, 2014, Hay Bales, Plants, Life Preservers, Life Safety Rings, Fossil Fuel Based Objects, Rope, 12’ x12’ circle x approx. 4’high

Rescue is an installation about humanity’s alarming dependence on carbon dioxide emitting, non renewable fossil fuels. Demands for fossil fuels are changing our climate and planet at an unprecedented rate. Will humans take action and make changes to reduce our use, adapt to renewable energy sources and rescue life as we know it? Are we bystanders or life guards?

Mary Dewart

Mary Dewart is a landscape designer and climate activist. She has taught numerous design workshops including Creating Sacred Space in Your Garden and Your Life and initiated and produced a wide ranging series of events and displays for all ages entitled Brookline Climate Week, a community call to climate education and action.

 

Ordinary Pine Installed

Linda Hoffman

Ordinary Pine, Trunks of pinus trobus

Three carved trunks of pinus strobus – the stalwart of New England trees.   Wander among us – look inside – reflect on our lives and stories.

 

Jake Portrait Peter Kronberg

Peter Kronberg

Jake 2009, Terra Cotta, 13” x 12 ½” x 12 ½“

Jake was at D-day on the beaches and saw action throughout WWII in France and Italy.  He returned unscathed but was not as fortunate when he returned to work as a cab driver in Boston.  Having survived the terrible dangers of war, he was stabbed by a passenger in his taxi cab. Fortunately, Jake survived that too and lived to tell me his story and sit for his portrait.

 

Mobi

Susan Israel

Mobi, 2014, Reclaimed truck tires, metal fasteners and rope, 8′ l  x  3′ w  x  30″ h

The undulating forms of “Mobi” are entwined by a rope, like vines, or seaweed, in a broken mobius strip. The rubber comes from a tire recycling plant that repurposes potentially toxic materials without chemicals, water or waste. Here at the Jackson Homestead, this whale-like presence reminds us of the complex relationship between seafaring trade and slaves who first came on ships and later found their way to freedom here on the underground railroad.

 

Artist Information:

Gail Jerauld Bos

Gail Bos is an artist who has worked on many installations over the years. Usually the installations with strong political focus are set up on street corners and at random sites throughout the city.  Other installations are developed for shows held at the historic Footlight Club in Jamaica Plain, the Massachusetts Statehouse Doric Hall and the Cambridge Art Association.  Gail Bos, in conjunction with The Museum of the National Center for Afro-American Artists, does early education art programs in Boston Public Schools.  Her studio is located at: 52 Green St Jamaica Plain gailbos@comcast.net  Website: wwwgailbos.com

Mary Dewart

Mary Dewart is a landscape designer and climate activist. She has taught numerous design workshops including Creating Sacred Space in Your Garden and Your Life and initiated and produced a wide ranging series of events and displays for all ages entitled Brookline Climate Week, a community call to climate education and action.

Linda Hoffman

Linda Hoffman has been part of the New England artist community since the early 1980’s. Her work is in the collections of Harvard University, the Boston Public Library, the Pierpont Morgan Library, NY, Hechinger Tool Museum, DC, the Acton Arboretum, as well as many private collections. This spring she will install, Tree Harp, a large bronze sculpture commission for the Town of Littleton, New Hampshire. In the summer of 2001 she moved to Harvard, Massachusetts, and began work to bring back an abandoned orchard. In 2006, Old Frog Pond Farm became the first certified organic pick your orchard in the state.  Hoffman and her partner, Blase Provitola, host community, art, and agriculture events at the farm throughout the year, including the annual outdoor sculpture exhibit, Around the Pond and through the Woods during apple picking season.

Susan Israel

In 2008 I decided that I wanted to do something to improve the environment that would have an impact beyond what I could do practicing architecture, as I had been for my entire career. What would motivate other people to do more as well? Something fun and visible. What was preventing people from doing more? Fear, and lack of belief that their actions matter. So I created the Energy Necklace Project to connect a community that fosters awareness and action about improving the health of our environment using art. Although my connection to art  has been start and stop over my life, I always return to it.  Energy Necklace Exhibitions and Rising Tides are my two major projects currently.  I also showed my own work in six exhibitions around Massachusetts in 2013, including several collaborations with Peter Lipsitt. An Energy Necklace Exhibition series will be at the Emerald Necklace in Boston starting Fall 2014.

The Energy Necklace Project uses art and workshops to teach sustainability, innovation and collaboration in businesses, communities and schools. We connect diverse communities in a dialogue about sustainability through the vehicle of public art and workshops and teach the skills of collaboration, leadership and creative thinking which are needed to innovate solutions. Through the Energy Necklace Project people become empowered to find solutions to overwhelming problems, and become connected to a larger community of solution seekers.

Milan Klic

Mine is a story of an immigrant, cultural fusion, ongoing, never complete.  I was born and educated in former Czechoslovakia, today’s Czech Republic.  At that time the country was a part of the communist block and all aspects of culture, visual arts in particular, were subject to political dogma and tough censorship.  My natural inclination towards sculpture seemed unrealistic in such environment, desires had to be put aside, postponed, silenced and reduced to dreams. I chose Natural Sciences (math, computer science) as a practical survivor’s way.  I graduated in 1974 from Palacky University, Olomouc  with MS and began my career as computer programmer.

As happens with totalitarian regimes, oppression spawns underground subculture where individuals live and create in seclusion, hiding from the society rather than seeking meaningful communication with others, except those who are in similar predicament – “internal emigrants”.  But, dreams are weaving their fabric in their realm, spontaneously, beyond rational and practical considerations. As a way of spiritual survival, I was seeking expression in visual arts, first drawing and terra-cotta sculptures, than wood-carved, figurative ones.  Most of the early figures are now in various private collections in Europe, others here

in US, reminders of a period of still evolving style.  Several exhibitions in the old country were recognized and appreciated mostly by people tied to the subculture by similar inner gravity. The conditions in former communist regime eventually led to emigration in 1985.

Exposure to highly technological, concept-driven civilization manifested itself in transformed perception, changed themes, materials used, and aesthetic values.  After the “Velvet revolution” in Czechoslovakia, when we all sighed with some relief, my sculptural expression was of rather intimate, lyrical nature. I gained a lot when I studied sculpture at Brandeis University, Waltham, MA in 1989-1992. Relatively peaceful 1990’s produced array of spatial metaphors, still readable in language of classical abstract modernism, bearing the seal of European heritage. But things are not going “velvet” in contemporary world; recent years profoundly changed our ways of thinking about the world, anxieties yet unknown are now common articles of everyday experience. I feel it as my inner choice to respond to this traumatized social and cultural milieu.

Awards

2001 -  Pollock-Krasner grant   Jan.-Dec. 2001

2003 – Cambridge Art Association, MA – award for best sculpture at annual show

2004 -  Cambridge Art Association, MA -  director’s choice award for sculpture

2004 -  Cambridge Art Association, MA – “Blue” , juried exhibition, “Best of Show” award

3 Bradford Terrace #3, Brookline MA, 02446 Phone 617-731-6240 E-mail: mklic@email.com

 

Peter Kronberg

I am a business attorney who also makes sculpture.  I live and work in Newton.  I studied sculpture in school so I am not entirely self-taught. I have shown and sold my art over the years and I could provide you with a list of where and who but it isn’t terribly impressive and will bore you.

Peter Lipsitt

Peter Lipsitt has shown outdoor sculpture at Harbor Arts East Boston (current);  Boston City Hall (current); Old Frog Pd., Harvard, MA (w/ Susan Israel); Chesterwood in Stockbridge, MA;  Lars Andersen Park, Brookline, curated by Nick Capasso; Triangle Arts Association, founded by Anthony Caro in Pine Plains, NY;  Lewis Wharf, Boston; Tiverton, RI; Wheaton College, Norton, MA; Wheelock College, Boston, MA; Sculpture Key West, Key West, FL; Rose Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA;  Art Complex Museum, Duxbury, MA. His work is in the collections of the Rose Art Museum, Fogg Art Musuem at Harvard University, Fort Lauderdale Museum, DeCordova Museum, Hamilton College, Vassar College, and in many private collections. Recently he completed a commission for a large outdoor steel work in New York state.

He has permanent large-scale public sculpture at Bajko Skating Rink in Hyde Park, MA,  University Place, Cambridge, and has outdoor work on extended loan in the outdoor atrium at Boston City Hall.

Peter Lipsitt, raised in an ocean-front Massachusetts village, is a graduate of Brandeis University (BA) and Yale University School of Art (BFA, MFA-1965). He also attended the Skowhegan School program.  In the 1960s he taught in the US Peace Corps in Ethiopia. At various times he has been a professor at Brandeis, Wheaton College, Emmanuel College, and Wentworth Institute in sculpture,drawing and/or design.

As a founding member of Boston Sculptors Gallery, he has presented many solo exhibitions in its successive gallery locations.  Fuller Art Museum, Wheaton College, Brown University, and Mather House, Harvard University have each given him solo exhibitions.

Lipsitt works in a variety of cast and assembled materials, most recently cement, steel, and wood in combination, having also created bronze and aluminum works in unique casts.  He is the recipient of a generous grant in 2007 from Artist Resource Trust (A.R.T.), a fund of Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation, faculty grants from Wheaton College, and other grants from the Brookline Arts Council.  His longtime studio is in the Piano Factory, South End, Boston, MA.

Margot Stage

Margot Stage was introduced to fabric art in 2001. Previously, she worked as a National Public Radio producer and host, primarily at WGBH, and as a freelance writer. Stage’s work in the visual arts was immediately accepted into juried exhibitions and has been shown extensively. Recently, she has expanded into three-dimensional work and installations.

Her work has been selected for exhibition at The Carnegie Center for Art & History, Indiana; The International Quilt Festival, Texas; Anderson Chase Gallery and Main Street Gallery, New York. She has been accepted in the Northeast Prize Show, RED and BLUE at the Cambridge Art Association, and has shown her work at the Arsenal Center for the Arts, Fruitlands Museum, Fitchburg Art Museum, Arnold Arboretum, Whistler House Museum of Art, Brickbottom Gallery, Lesley University, Bunker Hill Community College, Indian Hill Music Center, Moose Hill Audubon Gallery, Concord Art Association, The Center for Art in Natick, Fiber Arts Center, Gallery 119, and Brush Art Gallery. Her audio art piece “Dune Shack Sound Track” was exhibited at The Schoolhouse Center for the Arts in Provincetown. Her monoprints were shown at the DeCordova Museum School Gallery.

Stage’s work has appeared in Fiber Arts Magazine, The Boston Globe, The Lowell Sun, Wild Apples, The Middlesex Beat, The Ithaca Journal, The Boston Phoenix, and The Westford Eagle. Her work is held in the collections of Enterprise Bank, The Jeanne D’Arc Credit Union and by many private individuals. She works out of the Western Avenue Studios in Lowell.

Gabrielle White

Gabrielle White is a self-taught artist who has been sculpting and constructing art from repurposed material since childhood. She was inspired by her grandfather whose basement workshop held a magical array of bent and rusted objects waiting for a new life.  Time spent in the woods, rivers and mountains gave her a child’s eye and heart of an explorer.  Travels to Nepal opened her eyes to the spiritual realm and the connectedness of all things.

She is always experimenting with new ways to express a story through the creative recycling of items found in scrap metal piles, thrift shops, demolition sites and old barns. Her sculpture uses bicycle wheels, cast iron gears, glass, old tools, wood and stone to communicate our connection to the natural world.  Through her pieces she seeks to create the balance point between/within the physical and spiritual realms.

Jeanne Williamson

Jeanne Williamson’s work can be seen in galleries and museums, and in many books and magazines. A print of her work is also available at Crate & Barrel stores.

She has a BFA from Philadelphia College of Art (now the University of the Arts), where she majored in Fibers/Crafts. In addition to being trained as an artist, Jeanne has an MSAEd in Art Education from Massachusetts College of Art.

Jeanne is represented by the Gravers Lane Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, and the deCordova Museum of Art Corporate Art Loan Program in Lincoln, MA. Jeanne lives in Natick, MA with her husband.

website: http://www.jeannewilliamson.com